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The Free Social Media Training Platform

We have had success providing our social media training platform to a number of REALTOR Boards (an example in far flung Oklahoma City) and are extending the platform to any associations or enterprises who can use a social media training resource free. The free social media training platform View more presentations from Pat Kitano. We’re […]

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Slideshow: Posterous is the new blog

Originally published Sept. 29. 2009: I originally intended this slideshow for local business people who wanted a blog for marketing purposes, but didn’t have the inclination to start a blog due to writing and time commitments. After posting the slideshow, I received feedback that Posterous was a great method to create new “blogs” on a […]

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Lifestreaming, Blogging and Microblogging – how they fit together

from last year’s 06/02/08 slideshow: Explaining Twitter, Friendfeed & Social Media 2.0. I just added Lifestreaming. With the advent of Twitter and the real time web, can blogs can chronicle real time as effectively as micro-blogging tools? Last week Steve Rubel introduced his move from blogging to lifestreaming with a new lifestream site based on […]

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Aggregating Citizen Journalists @ Examiner.com

San Francisco’s “second” newspaper, the Examiner, launched Examiner.com last year not as the online equivalent for the San Francisco paper, but as a national forum for recruiting citizen journalists to report on the variety of topics a typical newspaper would cover. Participants set up blogs for their topic and city that allows them to develop […]

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Online news is a commodity, readers won’t pay for it

The Denver Post is conducting a poll to its readers – would you pay to access news online? The Denver Post already plans to start charging for content. Would the overwhelming results of this informal reader poll change their mind? It boils down to, how stupid are they? This is a followup from yesterday’s article […]

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Twitter Education for Kids

Twitter is arguably the simplest and easiest online social networking / broadcasting application to learn, and one any kid can use almost instantly. The Guardian UK reports that a proposal is being submitted to overhaul the primary school curriculum to include: Children to leave primary school familiar with blogging, podcasts, Wikipedia and Twitter as sources […]

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The End of Long Comments

Two years ago, online conversation used to reside on blogs and their commentators. The objective was to make and validate points of discussion. Now, soundbite communication – SMS, micro-blogging, “like” – distills communication down to making the point. The speed of online communication is accelerating because, in simplest possible terms, there are now more people […]

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Online Ubiquity & Personal Syndication

The online conversation happens everywhere on a ubiquitous cloud. I Twittered a link to a NYTimes article: My Twitter feed is incorporated into my FriendFeed account Which then gets fed into my Facebook account: Where friend Ross Rylance commented on it. Veterans of Facebook, Friendfeed, Linkedin and Twitter know this phenomenon well. This is a […]

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The Future is LATimes.com, not LA Times the Paper

Last week, LA Times editor Russ Stanton was quoted telling a forum at USC’s Annenberg School of Communications: “I think big-city newspapers, the way we have known them, are not long for this world, as they’re now configured.” Over the weekend, John Jarvis on Huffington Post glommed onto another quote by Stanton: “(The)Times’ Web site […]

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“Breaking News” is a Mass Media Play

The mass media – CNN, Marketwatch.com, NYT.com – all depend upon delivering “breaking news”  relevant to their audience. It’s been that way since “Extra, Extra, Read all about it”. The “breaking news” play is evident in the institution blog world with properties like Engadget and Gizmodo warring to get the latest tech toy published first. […]

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